Shock moment Susanna Reid says ‘s*a*’ on Good Morning Britain in embarrassing slip of the tongue

SUSANNA Reid glossed over an embarrassing slip of the tongue today when she said “s*a*” on Good Morning Britain.

The 50-year-old made the early-morning gaffe when she tried to say “chat” and got her letters mixed up.

Susanna Reid accidentally swore on Good Morning Britain

Susanna was discussing Scottish player Billy Gilmour missing out on last night’s Euros match after his positive coronavirus test.

His Chelsea teammates Mason Mount and Ben Chilwell are self-isolating for ten days – despite not contracting the virus – after hugging the player.

“I really feel for Billy Gilmour because that was obviously a missed opportunity for him to have to be in isolation,” said Susanna.

“I know yesterday we had the big row about how come he’s the only Scottish player to be isolating and how come two English players have to isolate after they had a s*a* with him.”

The moment wasn't missed by viewers

The moment wasn’t missed by viewers

Immediately correcting herself Susanna said: “A chat with him…”

She ignored her accidental faux pas without so much of a mention.

But it didn’t go unnoticed by viewers, with one remarking: “According to Susanna Reid on GMB “‘Mason Mount and Ben Chilwell had a 20 minute S*A* with Billy Gilmour’.”

He joked: “No wonder they all isolated last night!”

Although Susanna’s swearing was unintentional, a study last year found having a potty mouth like telly chef Gordon Ramsay helps us handle pain and problems much better.

Swearing like telly chef Gordon Ramsay helps us handle pain and problems much better, a study has found

Swearing like telly chef Gordon Ramsay helps us handle pain and problems much better, a study has foundCredit: Getty – Contributor

Research showed bad language is good for our mental health — with women just as likely as men to turn the air blue.

More than a quarter of Brits say swearing has helped them stay motivated during lockdown.

Two fifths (41 per cent) admit they have sworn at themselves to boost enthusiasm.

Cursing is also used to help cope with stress by more than a third (36 per cent).

And a quarter (27 per cent) say it helps them feel better when they are having a bad day.

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