Signs your child is has heatstroke, and keeping cool in the heatwave


The hot weather can cause illness – but it’s easily prevented (Picture: Getty)

June has already seen the hottest day of the year recorded, with temperatures reaching 26.6°C.

Lying about in the sun is great, but everyone knows too much of it can be a bad thing, and it is especially dangerous for children and babies.

Youngsters, especially those under four-years-old, and elderly people over 75 are at the highest risk of getting heat stroke and extra care should be taken with them.

Here is what to look out for and how to treat heatstroke…

Signs your child is suffering heatstroke

The NHS suggests that the signs and symptoms to look out for are the same in children and adults, except that children can become ‘floppy and sleepy’.


girl fans herself with portable fan

Children with heatstroke become ‘floppy and sleepy’ (Picture: Getty)

Other symptoms can include:

  • Headache
  • Dizziness and confusion,
  • Loss of appetite and feeling sick
  • Excessive sweating and pale clammy skin
  • Cramps in the arms, legs and stomach
  • Fast breathing or fast pulse
  • Temperature of 38°C or above
  • Intense thirst

You should ring 999 if your child is:

  • Feeling unwell after 30 minutes of resting in a cool place and drinking plenty of water
  • Not sweating even while feeling too hot
  • A high temperature of 40°C or above
  • Fast breathing or shortness of breath
  • Feeling confused
  • A fit (seizure)
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Not responsive

To prevent heatstroke, dress your children in loose light-coloured cotton or linen clothing. You should also sprinkle some water over their clothes or skin.

Staying hydrated is key, too, as is staying out of the sun between 11am and 3pm.


children playing in a pool

Getting your kids a paddling pool is a great way to keep them cool – and ensure they have fun! (Picture: Getty)

How to keep cool in the heatwave

Tips to keep cool in the heatwave include closing curtains to create shaded rooms in the house, and reducing alcohol intake.

If you’re going outside, wear a wide-brimmed hat, and keep out of direct sunlight if you can.

Take plenty of water with you when you leave the house.

Always remember that the warm weather can be especially taxing for older members of the family, children, and pets – so keep an eye out for them, too.

Follow Metro across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram

Share your views in the comments below



Publisher

Total
0
Shares
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related Posts

https://brentfordgymnasticsclub.com/wp-includes/sbobet/

https://jenniferallenlaw.com/wp-includes/sbobet/

https://advantagehomecare.com/wp-includes/sbobet/

Bocoran Slot Gacor

Slot Gacor

Slot777

Slot777

Demo Slot

SBOBET

https://phuonghoangschool.com/wp-includes/

http://nvzprd-agentmanifest.ivanticloud.com/

https://www.dcosmeticclinics.com.au/wp-includes/sbobet/

https://thetastesoflife.com/wp-includes/sbobet/